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The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven by Sherman Alexie

The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven by Sherman Alexie
The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven by Sherman Alexie
SKU: 2211883
Units in Stock: 1
Includes an introduction and two new stories. The basis for the major motion picture from Miramax Films, Smoke Signals, winner of two Sundance Film Festival awards.
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List Price: P580.00
Price: P220.00
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Product Details
NOTE: image for reference only. Actual copy is the newer edition Grove Press 2005.

Format: Trade paperback

Condition: vg- condition, minor shelf wear

Size: 5.25"x8.0"

Pages: 256pp, 2005 edition

Others: All defects if any are formulated into pricing

In this darkly comic short story collection, Sherman Alexie, a Spokane/Coeur d'Alene Indian, brilliantly weaves memory, fantasy, and stark realism to paint a complex, grimly ironic portrait of life in and around the Spokane Indian Reservation. These twenty-two interlinked tales are narrated by characters raised on humiliation and government-issue cheese, and yet are filled with passion and affection, myth and dream. There is Victor, who as a nine-year-old crawled between his unconscious parents hoping that the alcohol seeping through their skins might help him sleep, Thomas Builds-the-Fire, who tells his stories long after people stop listening, and Jimmy Many Horses, dying of cancer, who writes letters on stationary that reads "From the Death Bed of Jimmy Many Horses III," even though he actually writes then on his kitchen table. Against a backdrop of alcohol, car accidents, laughter, and basketball, Alexie depicts the distances between Indians and whites, reservation Indians and urban Indians, men and women, and mostly poetically between modern Indians and the traditions of the past.